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055_1982.279.35_George Rehn to Brother and Sister_April 18, 1919 - Date Letter Written: April 18, 1919 Letter Written By: George Rehn Letter Written To: Brother and Sister Full transcription of letter: 055_1982.279.35_George Rehn to Brother and Sister_April 18, 1919_Page 01 St. Nazaire [April 18, 1919] Bro and Sis! Went out to see the 138th yesterday who are here with the 35th Div. and are about to shoot for home. The 138th you know is composed mostly of St. Louisians. I went out with a lad living on Sarah St. who has several friends in above unit and I had three, but we saw not a one. One of my freinds was sent to Bordeaux, he being sick, another they could not account for and the other was bumped off. They should reach the States by the end of the month and St. Louis by the middle of May. Each and every one is just crazy to set foot on Bdway and Olive once more. As for us, well thats thats all together different, we are here untill the Irish have a navy all their own. It has turned considerable 055_1982.279.35_George Rehn to Brother and Sister_April 18, 1919_Page 02 colder the last few days, last night being a dandy. Their must have been a storm out at sea as the rain was coming down in sheets and the wind was blowing about 50 per. I was on the 2nd watch last night but luckily in a warehouse out of it all. I stand the 3rd watch to night and tomorrow morning, then am on liberty for two days during which I am going to do some tall sleeping. Their is quite a bit of pinochle playing going on here of late and we have been having some hot games. Poker and craps have their time to about five days after pay-day, some one gets a streak of luck and the balance have to resort to gambling of a milder nature due to lack of money. I am glad to note that you both are well and the kids the same. It is too bad that George had to be laid off, but then you know, if a man is 055_1982.279.35_George Rehn to Brother and Sister_April 18, 1919_Page 03 willing and ambitious their is always a job for him somewhere. I recieved a letter from E.C. yesterday enclosing Harleys address. He is at A.P.O. 716 which I have found to be Brest and if such is the case, and he is staying out at the Pont anezan Barracks he has my sympathy. It is one hell hole. Got two letters from Dad and the gals last week. Dads letters are rather interesting as he writes of every little detail that happens about the house. Say Whitey I hope you havent to taken to heart the letter I wrote you at one time calling you for not writing. You know me Rudolph, I was just kidding. You say you dont know what to write. Well write anything, when you took a bath 055_1982.279.35_George Rehn to Brother and Sister_April 18, 1919_Page 04 last, how sorry you are that you married, what you think of your mother in law, how you like your eggs fried, any damm thing that comes to your mind. It all goes good over here. Well Im going to get in Pinochle game now so will close. Hoping you have a job athis writing and every thing is rosy Resp. George H. Rehn Just Received the G.D. of [March] 23rd

Date Letter Written: April 18, 1919 Letter Written By: George Rehn Letter Written To: Brother and Sister Full transcription of letter: 055_1982.279.35_George Rehn to Brother and Sister_April 18, 1919_Page 01 St. Nazaire [April 18, 1919] Bro and Sis! Went out to see the 138th yesterday who are here with the 35th Div. and are about to shoot for home. The 138th you know is composed mostly of St. Louisians. I went out with a lad living on Sarah St. who has several friends in above unit and I had three, but we saw not a one. One of my freinds was sent to Bordeaux, he being sick, another they could not account for and the other was bumped off. They should reach the States by the en

062_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_April 13, 1918 - Date Letter Written: April 13, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Ogee (Jay) Stevenson Full transcription of letter: 062_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_April 13, 1918_Page 01 [Camp Funston] Sunday April 13 Dear Ogee: Your letter came just yesterday and I was mighty glad to hear from you and of your activities. From the description of your numerous moves I might imagine that you move when rent is due, but I guess most of your moves are necessities. You must be kept mighty busy with your building and your garden and side issues that always keep popping up. As for myself there is only one new thing. I do not do but one hour's drilling a day as I have been made clerk in the Supply Room working under Virginia Stone's brother, Phil, who is supply sergeant. He is a mighty fine fellow and I certainly like him and he treats me royally. The only trouble with the job is that it is indoor work most of the time. I have certainly thrived under outdoor work here and I have no desire to stick myself under a roof and fool with a pen and a typewriter. But that is the desire of the captain and I suppose it is what I shall have to do. Another angle I dislike is that it shuts off all chances of promotion unless Stone dies, gets killed or is transferred, all thre of which are remote and undesirable probabilities. No recent word has come from Maurice. The last note I got tells of plans for a furlough. He said he was very welll and in healthy condition. The same is my shape. Grandma wrote me day before yesterday that Uncle Kern of New York would be in Olathe next Sunday, so I am making plans to be there and as far as I can see I will be there. As far as getting a pass for next week my record is clean, so I should be there. Grandma told me you would like to see Uncle Kern and me both, so if you could come up next Sunday it would be pretty nice. Of course it is not positive I will be there, altho it is most probable This army life is one in which not future plans can be made with certainty. I should know Friday night whether I can come for sure or not. So if you will write and tell me a once if you can come home next Sunday In case I CANNOT I will wire you Friday night in time to let you know Saturday morning. Please let me hear from you by return mail so I will know what to do. I have in a request for a five day furlough, which will be granted in about thirty days I guess, the exact time of which I do not know. I will let you know and if you cannot come Sunday you might be able to come then. Love, Charlie

Date Letter Written: April 13, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Ogee (Jay) Stevenson Full transcription of letter: 062_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_April 13, 1918_Page 01 [Camp Funston] Sunday April 13 Dear Ogee: Your letter came just yesterday and I was mighty glad to hear from you and of your activities. From the description of your numerous moves I might imagine that you move when rent is due, but I guess most of your moves are necessities. You must be kept mighty busy with your building and your garden and side issues that always keep popping up. As for myself there is only one new thing. I do not do but one hour's drill

079_1982.279.35_Billy Daues to George Rehn_January 25, 1919 - Date Letter Written: January 25, 1919 Letter Written By: Billy Dause Letter Written To: George Rehn Full transcription of letter: 079_1982.279.35_Billy Daues to George Rehn_January 25, 1919_Page 01 "Little Pebbe" Little Rock [Arkansas] [January] 28 - 1919. Dear Friend [George]. Having nothing to do and wishing to do it I thought I would answer your most welcomed letter of [December] 21st just received. Well Old Top I sure was glad to hear from you also that you are in the best of health and enjoying yourself? Well I guess no doubt you have recived my letter which I wrote you the first of the year telling you of our trip to dear Old St. Louis. Belive me I sure hated to come back. Well I hope you got your good feed you 079_1982.279.35_Billy Daues to George Rehn_January 25, 1919_Page 02 [page 2] were expecting on New Years Day. Your letter was recived today and I also got a letter from Old Sits he said that Mrs Krieger had written to you so you can be on the look out for it. Say Old Top don't forget little Willie for a Souvenir before you come back any thing will do outside of a "cootie" "pants rabbit". Well I am still doing the same as ever on the job. The boss was down to pay me a visit last week and gave me a couple of good boosts. Well [George] we are the 079_1982.279.35_Billy Daues to George Rehn_January 25, 1919_Page 03 [page 3] same as ever. Enjoying the best of health. I guess you were some what surprised to meet your friend from the Grand Leader. Yes [George] I wrote at least a half dozen letter to you while you were at [Parris Island] no doubt you have recived them by now as they have never been returned. Well the we weather here is nice and warm a little to much so for this time of the year, I fear we will pay up for it in February. 079_1982.279.35_Billy Daues to George Rehn_January 25, 1919_Page 04 [page 4] Old Sits said he was going to drop you a line in the near future as I have forwarded your address to him. Just got a letter today from Mr & Mrs Krieger they have not got over the surprise we gave them by walking in on them Christmas Morning. Belive me it nearly took their breath as they had given up all hopes of us being up there Christmas. Well Old Top you won't be in style if you do not grab one of those fair French Maiden and bring her on with you. Ha! Ha! Every day the paper is writing about some one of 079_1982.279.35_Billy Daues to George Rehn_January 25, 1919_Page 05 [October] 5 the boys hitching up with one. Have you learned the language as yet? Remember you first must learn that before you can make any head way with the fair Sex. Ha! Ha! Well [George] how soon do you expect to return? By June what? Say don't forget the Souvenir and if possible send with it a snap shot (or any kind of a shot) of your self. Well [George] will close now hoping this letter will find you enjoying the best of health and with best wishes from my wife and self. As Ever Yours. Billy Daues. 1100 Rice St. Little Rock, [Arkansas] So Long "Venus"

Date Letter Written: January 25, 1919 Letter Written By: Billy Dause Letter Written To: George Rehn Full transcription of letter: 079_1982.279.35_Billy Daues to George Rehn_January 25, 1919_Page 01 "Little Pebbe" Little Rock [Arkansas] [January] 28 - 1919. Dear Friend [George]. Having nothing to do and wishing to do it I thought I would answer your most welcomed letter of [December] 21st just received. Well Old Top I sure was glad to hear from you also that you are in the best of health and enjoying yourself? Well I guess no doubt you have recived my letter which I wrote you the first of the year telling you of our trip to dear Old St. Louis. Belive me I sure hated to come b

110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918 - Date Letter Written: September 18, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of letter: 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 01 I'm sending a couple of your letters on to Maurice France [September 18, 1918] Dear People: This is the seventh day of the St. Mihiel drive and I find myself sitting in a thick muddy forest, with my knees and gas mask as a table, writing to tell you I went thru my first real touch of war and came out with nothing more serious than the loss of some sleep and a couple of tears in my best leggins. Of course, I lost various articles of clothing, but that was to be expected, so I'm not complaining. Suffice to say I still have one pair of pajamas and that looking glass I took while home one Sunday. It was some drive. Small, in comparison to many, operations, to we rookies it was a real battle. Machine guns, rifles, shells, aeroplanes, and tanks - everything you read about - I saw 'em all. We followed the first 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 02 line (the attacking party) for twelve hours and ours was a sort of "after the battle" review. I saw all kinds of German trenches, barbed wire entanglements, busted houses, burning trees, deep shell holes, torn-up railroad tracks, peaceful gardens, dynamited bridges - and lots of things I had read of, but never seen. All kinds of German prisoners passed me on the way back. It was interesting - and to our side highly satisfactory. Our company had a few men injured - none you know. Phil is all right; Kenneth was not even here - still at school. One night we slept in a hay barn; the next night a few of we sergeants slept in a German colonel's quarters. I got a few souveniers - as soon as we get back to a rest place where I can get some good strong envelopes I 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 03 [page 2] will send 'em to you. The best of all is blank form of a bond - the eighth German war loan. I also got some shoulder straps. It is impossible to carry anywheres near all you can get. Enough of the drive - we did in two days what we were supposed to do in five. As soon as I get to a typewriter I'll tell you a few incidents - interesting and humorous. Maurice was in it - on our left, I think. No word from him has come of course. As I understand it his division had the hardest place of the entire attack. We know Major Bland, of [Kansas City], was killed. Our commanding officer was only ten feet from him when he was shelled. Personally, I'm feeling great, altho I would like to get a hair cut, and hear some music. By the way in one of the German camps we found a 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 04 piano - and a Victor talking machine. As soon as we move back and I can persuade Phil to lend me his Corona for a couple of hours I'll tell more of it! Once more I saw - enough of War! - for this time. Yesterday I got eight letters and today I got twenty! Believe me - it was a grand a glorious feeling - I guess had one great time with 'em - they came from you all - Dave, M. K., Blakes, Mrs. Rankin, Grant, [Maurice], Paul, Mary, Mary Helen, Evelyn - etc. I am way, way behind. But I'll get caught up some time. The Riving - Pitt pads came, as did the ink tablets - thank all of you ever so much. None of you need send me any more pads, as Aunt Kate will send 'em to me. But I wish you would buy some ink tablets and enclose one in each letter you write. Also some fairly heavy rubber bands 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 05 [page 3] once in a while come in handy - and a few blotters. I got two from Aunt Daisy - both from Denver. I'm glad you like those letters, Aunt Daisy. I'll keep coming as regularly as possible! everything you have sent so far has come to me I am sure! I've not a complaint to make a single thing! It's mighty fine you got to go to Denver. The rest was certainly a needed one and I am glad you enjoyed yourself. Colorado is a stamping ground for Reed Gentry, as he goes there most every summer. He sent me a booklet from the Missouri Bankers Association showing my name as being on the "Roll of Honor". Ross Rheam being in France probably means that he is at some naval base, doing clerical work, Naval Aviation is where several friends of mine are. It seems 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 06 to be a peculiar kind of work - I do not know the exact character of it. Next summer you expect to be in [Devils Lake] - Make it the 1920 summer and I will do my best to be there. Dave and I are planning to make various visits in that state. Letters from Grandma - [August 10, August 13, August 23] came today. Good time, especially the latter. All these letters were dandy ones, the one of the 23rd acknowledging receipt of the scarf being full of lots of news. The Irving-Pitt pads sent were absolutely correct all over. They fit my book fine - Thanks! We haven't had any "blue envelopes" for some time, but I haven't had anything much to say in 'em, so what's the difference? That clipping of mine in the paper much have been react all over the world. People I know in Washington, D.C., and in New York City and Virginia told me of it - not to mention all kinds of [Kansas City] folks. 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 07 [page 4] Aunt Kate wrote me that Grandma was sick. I hope by now you are all well and hopping around as much as always. Scratching and scratching - don't mention it to me! I've been doing it, too, but not from poison ivy!! - Don't take my statements of my intentions to get married as soon as I return too seriously. First - a girl must be found - then financial condition must be considered - so wait till I get back!! Thank all of you for taking such good care of all our stuff in the barn. Have any of you ever been to the cemetery this summer and fall? I notice no mention was made of going out there but once in quite awhile. I'm leaving it to you all to see that the graves there are kept in good shape! I saw long ago that Henry Allen was nominated and O'Gee told me that you had been chosen as Republican nominee for the State Legislature. It would be 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 08 mighty fine if you could accept it and go to Topeka for the Sessions, but I hope you won't if it will hurt you physically. But - I'm sure they couldn't have made a better choice. Send me some clippings on the subject - and put some in my book - don't forget this! I must write Aunt May and congratulate her on her entry into the field of journalism. She won't have a bit of trouble holding down the job. Send me the Register, will you please. The Star comes - certainly it will! - The folks with the Blakes were Suddarths. I know Fred very well. He was a Webster - and a good one, too. Also - a fine clean youth - exceptional intellect. Now - the one of [August 23] - I'm glad you got the scarf and that you enjoyed it so much, altho I certainly do not see where you can use it. I sent M. K. one of another color - the same kind exactly. There is a possibility that she 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 09 [page 5] might be able to use hers at the "U". Yours was sent mostly as a remembrance. I'll send a few things from time to time. Postal regulations forbid sending much. I am lugging around a table cover taken from the table of a German colonel, which I'll send on, if possible! Did I once say "- six months more"? All wrong - and easier to see constantly. If it's over by the fall of 1920 I will be satisfied. If I'm home Christmas 1920, I will consider myself very lucky! That picture I had taken in New York wasn't so very good. I do not believe I sent any to M. K., but don't worry I surely haven't forgotten her - nor has she me, as I hear from her all the time. From her letter, I gather this is the very first day of her Senior year at the "U". Letters from Mary Pugh come regularly - none ever come from Dorothy. I am, sure none of them ever got to Olathe. This all right. All concerned are just as well off. 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 10 So Frances Morrison and Helen Ott are gone to Washington. I know other girls, there, too. I wrote a letter to Helen and Dorothy Nelson source time ago - no reply yet. Dandy girls - all of the Olathe girls. As soon as I get caught up on some of these thirty letters I'll write to H. Hallett. The end of that dandy letter! Today has been a nice, peaceful day. Some shelling - not very close - machines overhead constantly. No longer is this a quiet sector. No telling when I can mail this - we are far from mail - headquarters, as far as outgoing stuff is concerned. - And as you might guess - our officers are rather busy to devote much time to censorship. Never sorry about me! No news is always good news! I'm in great shape physically now, except that needed hair cut. My best love to you all [Charles] [signature censored by Lt. Rudesill 1st L. Engrs. U.S.A.] I mashed one of my fountain pens all to pieces. As soon as I can get an order I'll let you send me one. Don't do anything about it 'till you hear from me.

Date Letter Written: September 18, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of letter: 110_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 18, 1918_Page 01 I'm sending a couple of your letters on to Maurice France [September 18, 1918] Dear People: This is the seventh day of the St. Mihiel drive and I find myself sitting in a thick muddy forest, with my knees and gas mask as a table, writing to tell you I went thru my first real touch of war and came out with nothing more serious than the loss of some sleep and a couple of tears in my best leggins. Of course, I lost various articles of clothing, but that was to be expected, so I'm not

118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918 - Date Letter Written: October 12, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of letter: 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 01 France [October 12, 1918] Dear Folks: Just 414 years ago today Columbus discovered America - four months ago today we sailed from America and today we are in a "rest area" taking life easy for perhaps a week after being on the front for two months. We had quite a time getting relieved. In one night we hiked thirty kilometers (twenty miles) which is surely some hike. It was at night and it rained nearly all night long. Just before we started I found an umbrella and Marmon and I used it all night. You can imagine me walking along with a big heavy pack on my back - 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 02 pitch dark, pouring down rain - and carrying a big umbrella! It sure was funny - but it kept the rain off of me x About one-fourth of the way on the road I turned my right ankle (my good ankle). It didn't seem to bother me. About the middle of the trip we pulled into a big shed and rested for an hour. During this rest my ankle grew cold and when we started out I couldn't hold the pace and for the first time in my life, I had to drop out. Well, I meandered around back of the company, going just about as slow as motion goes. It had stopped raining again by this time - the time was 1:30 A.M. I wandered along and finally here came a towing car. I stopped it and told 'em my trouble. Some deep-voice from the rear told me to hop in. Then they got 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 03 [page 2] lost and found themselves at some cross roads with a French M. P. in charge. 'Twas about 2 A.M. They couldn't understand French, so I stepped to the front and talked my French to the M. P. I got the desired information for the occupants of the car and they from then on respected me - in silence, I guess, because they never a word to me x We finally pulled into a town - and when I got out I found out it was a major - Major Brown adjutant of the 89th Division staff. Quite a prominent man, you can bet! 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 04 Well - 'tis three a.m. I found my way into a stable and slept on a bed of good hay with my overcoat as cover. At seven bells I woke up and put my shoe on again. I cut a handle from a pitch fork and using it for a cane I sauntered out in the town. 'Twas one of the best towns in this part of France. I got grapes, apples, cookies, cheese and such - all this time taking in the sights and limping. I couldn't find any Red Cross dressing station or anything. But by this time my ankle had gotten much better and I decided to hike to where our company was - four kilometers. I started out (pouring down rain again) and had gotten only about one-quarter mile when along came 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 05 [page 3] a motorcycle with a side car - and the side car was empty. it picked me up and took me to just the place I wished to go. In this town, we lived in a brewery - and one in working order, too. We stayed only one night and pulled out again - under more desirable conditions - to where we now are. My ankle is all right now and doesn't seem to bother me at all. I hiked five miles under heavy pack on it - no trouble! It's a great life - if you don't weaken! The above is just one little incident in the life of ME. 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 06 No telling what our future holds. Probably we will go to another front. I hope the above story of experience don't tire you. It might make interesting reading. It certainly is a thrilling tale - nit! For this evening - that's all. Next morning - the rumor was that some mail would be in but none came - only three [Kansas City Journals] and a Woman's Home Companion. Who the heck send me a Woman's Home Companion is more than I can say - but I cut out some pictures, read the stories and go on my way! Last nite a letter came from Maurice, telling me he was to be sent to a training school with General Bamford. I'm sure glad, as he will get a chance to be in some good 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 07 [page 4] place for this coming winter. Last winter he was in the trenches most of the time. I'm feeling very well right now and hope I continue so. Personally this war hasn't hurt me one bit. If I come back feeling as fit as I now do, everything will be all right. The last letters from you all were dated September 10 and they were sure dandy ones. One typewritten one was from Aunt Daisy and one in hand from Grandma - both of the same date! If those letters I write are pleasing to you I certainly am glad as that's about all I care do to pay all of you back for all 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 08 you have done for me! I saw a clipping of a little incident about my meeting Maurice from the Kansas City Star. Good enough. I imagine I'll get a couple of letters from some Kansas City folks telling me of this. Don't worry about not being able to send me a birthday box. I'll get something from you when I come back. Speaking of "when I come back" - some time I'm going to write a story on what the various men of my company intend to do when they "are back". I think it would make a most interesting story. If I had a typewriter I sure would do that. That darn fountain pen of mine isn't worth a thing. I have to coax it and cajole the ink in coming out. When you send me a 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 09 [page 5] a pen be sure to send one that writes rather heavily. I like to see what I am putting down when I write. A recent letter from Helen Nelson told me of the Olathe girls who have gone to Washington, D.C. to work. That is certainly fine. They are only a short ways from New York City, Atlantic City, Philadelphia, Long Island and such and can see any of those towns between Saturday evening and Monday morning. Helen told me that Helen Betts was to teach in the Olathe high school. I think you will find Helen Betts a much more agreeable and desirable girl than you imagine; and I also believe she will be in with the very best of Olathe's girls. 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 10 Every one in a while I send you a copy of some of the newspapers we get over here. I imagine they are interesting to those who have never seen any of them. They would make a good display. Now - as to my scrap book - I wish you would cut some big headlines out of various papers that come to you about big advances, rumors of surrender, abdications and deaths of big men in the war, and put 'em in my book in some manner so that they can be kept together. You can paste 'em in if you care to - only if you do - try to get away from the ordinary pasting method. Fix 'em up in 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 11 [page 6] some novel style - shunt 'em across the page at angles and in any way to make the various pages novel and out of the ordinary. Be sure to put the dates on 'em. No milk is ever available for us. Once in a while we get a little bit of condensed cream. There seems to be some kind of an order against buying anything from the French civilians, so that would alone eliminate milk. That was certainly a most enjoyable letter you wrote, Aunt Daisy - I sure liked it. About every other week or so slip a khaki-colored handkerchief into one of you letters. It is often hard to get handkerchiefs and for you to mail me a handkerchief once in a while would assure me of a clean one at least that regularly. 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 12 These letters of yours were replies to the one I wrote telling of seeing Maurice for the first time. It has been over a month since I last saw him - and judging from the letter I got last night from him it will be some time before we meet again x So far I have received no copies of the Register (yes, I got one); I hope some come so that I can keep up on Olathe activities. No furlough is due me for a long time, but [Maurice] has one coming, which, he says, he will spend in England. That pass Maurice wrote me can be pasted in my book some time - along with the clipping of our meeting. Any time any clippings about [Maurice] or me or you appear - send 'em to me in an envelope, as papers mailed in bulk are liable not to complete the trip. I have been trying to buy something for Aunt Daisy, but the laws on sending out French merchandise 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 13 [page 7] are such that it is impossible to send out more than a handkerchief. I was luck y to be able to send you that scarf! I'm enclosing a couple of clippings which I consider good. Save 'em for me! You should see the dandy little photograph album I carry in my loose leaf note book. I take a page out and paste on it a [Kodak] picture. I now have about twelve - Maurice, M. K., Paul, Evelyn, Mary Helen, Mary and such. None are scenes of any places over here. No [Kodaks] are allowed. It would be hard to develop films - and to buy them would be harder yet. Such is life! Marmon and I are in the same platoon. We sleep together these cool nights. One night he 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 14 decided to sleep along. About two a.m. he got cold and hopped out of his bed into mine - and never brought any covers with him. You should have seen me chase him back for a couple of blankets he left on his cot. Phil is still here - supply sergeant - feeling and looking fine. Well - temporarily - I must quite. This gets me caught up on all my letters - the first time in months. Now - I'll write a few and get ahead, thereby assuring myself of letters. My best love to you all. [Charles] C.S. Stevenson Co. A - 314 Engrs. France Put A. P. O. #761 on my mail besides everything else, It will get to me quicker.

Date Letter Written: October 12, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of letter: 118_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_October 12, 1918_Page 01 France [October 12, 1918] Dear Folks: Just 414 years ago today Columbus discovered America - four months ago today we sailed from America and today we are in a "rest area" taking life easy for perhaps a week after being on the front for two months. We had quite a time getting relieved. In one night we hiked thirty kilometers (twenty miles) which is surely some hike. It was at night and it rained nearly all night long. Just before we started I found an umbrella and Marmon and I used i

128_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_November 14, 1918 - Date Letter Written: November 14, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of letter: 128_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_November 14, 1918_Page 01 France - [November 14, 1918] Dear Folks: It's been a long time since I wrote, but - "there's a reason" - and the reason is shown by Germany's acceptance of the Armistice. We chased the Boche way, way back - and the good news of November 11 is the result. Honestly, Folks! It seems too good to be true! We had very little idea it was coming and you can guess how much it pleased us. None of us can realize it yet - it certainly does seem to good to be true! To you all there it means the finish of the Germans - to us it means the same and a lot more. Until Maurice or I get back you won't know what this thing has meant! But its all over now and we are sleeping indoors every night, eating fairly well - and are warm - which is far, far more than can be said for us during the period of strife. I've got two or three interesting tales to tell - real stuff, too. 128_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_November 14, 1918_Page 02 Today a letter came from Aunt Daisy bearing the date of October 18 - thanks for the ink tablets, the blotter and especially the dandy rubber bands - they are just what I want and they sure do some in handy. As for my letters - I certainly am glad they are enjoyed by you - it is about the only thing I can do to thank you and repay you all for what you do for me. I think you are mistaken about Dorothy. I just got a letter from her and she is going to Poly and working for the [Kansas City] news Service in the afternoons. Mary, if reported as being engaged to Ross - I'm sure it is true. The part we played in the September drive will bear telling when we return. I doubt that the censor will pass any comments on our activities. Where we are today is a place in the public eye - and the damage done by the Germans is fierce! We are trying to open traffic ways and put in some busted bridges. 128_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_November 14, 1918_Page 03 The last few days of this last drive and the first few days after this armistice will certainly result in some good old stories. No souveniers for me! They get too heavy - socks are much more useful. I got a letter from Maurice last night in which he tells me he is liable to be sent to the States soon. I'm hoping he gets there before I do. As to when we are coming home - my guess is that we will get there between February 1 and 22. Absolutely no way of telling, though. I'm feeling very well now, Folks. In the course of a month I think I will have seen a lot of country - perhaps not of France, either! But you may know more about us than we do - the only time we know anything is after it is done! My best love, Charlie Be sure to save clippings of the peace stories for me. Sergt 1st Cl C.S.Stevenson Co. A - 314th Engrs. Amex Force France

Date Letter Written: November 14, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of letter: 128_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_November 14, 1918_Page 01 France - [November 14, 1918] Dear Folks: It's been a long time since I wrote, but - "there's a reason" - and the reason is shown by Germany's acceptance of the Armistice. We chased the Boche way, way back - and the good news of November 11 is the result. Honestly, Folks! It seems too good to be true! We had very little idea it was coming and you can guess how much it pleased us. None of us can realize it yet - it certainly does seem to good to be true! To you all there it mean

141_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_December 25, 1918 - Date Letter Written: December 25, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Ogee (Jay) Stevenson Full transcription of letter: 141_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_December 25, 1918_Page 01 [Speicher, Germany] Christmas Eve Dear O'Gee: Just a few feet from me are members of a typical German family, throwing up a tiny Christmas tree, decorating it thoroughly in accordance with all respect due to the famed Christmas tree. That was one thing I never remember having in the Stevenson annals - a Christmas tree. I don't say that we never had one, but I do not remember any. This is a peculiar Christmas to me - I can't express exactly my feelings - no gloomy thoughts, I'll tell you, but something is sure lacking. Today a box came from Olathe - it was not the authorized Christmas box - supposed to contain 141_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_December 25, 1918_Page 02 the watch and fountain pen. Well, the box came, all right, but back in the Service of Supplies, some one had opened the box and taken the watch and the fountain pen out. Grandma wrote me that they had refused to take the money from my account and that you had furnished the money as a gift to me - I certainly do appreciate it and thank you ever so much. I've had the darndest luck with my personal property over here. Two times have I lost all my stuff - well, I can't complain, I'm lucky to be feeling as fine as I am. But I was mighty disappointed when I opened the box and found the watch and pen removed. I grabbed the box and hollered with joy - "It sure came on an appropriate day!" And then to find what I did. I sure looked forward to those things, too. 141_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_December 25, 1918_Page 03 In the last five days I have received four letters from you - [November 1] - [November 7] [November 19] - [November 28] - the last made fine time. I know you are pretty busy and it must take quite a bit of your time to write to Maurice and me - that makes your letters all the more appreciated. The last word I had from Maurice was that he hoped to leave for the States any minute - I hope he has gone and is there tonite! I would cable you folks once in a while, but it takes so much red tape. I have never done it - and then I never had anything of importance to cable. No new dope about coming home - I believe it will be some time in March. Somebody will have to stay here for a year though - not for me! What I want to do when I get back is: see Maurice; visit Devils Lake, Chicago, get a job and get married. The first are easy - the last uncertain. 141_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_December 25, 1918_Page 04 The map I am enclosing shows you about where I was in the last six days of the war. Perhaps it will interest you. My platoon is still detached from the company doing railroad inspection word - it is the easiest job I have had since the Army drew me. Feeling fine! I'm going to a nearby town tomorrow where Kenneth stays. He and I know some girls there and we are to have Christmas with them. Love, Charlie Sergt. C.S.Stevenson Co. A - 314th Engrs Amex Force

Date Letter Written: December 25, 1918 Letter Written By: Charles Stevenson Letter Written To: Ogee (Jay) Stevenson Full transcription of letter: 141_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Ogee (Jay) Stevenson_December 25, 1918_Page 01 [Speicher, Germany] Christmas Eve Dear O'Gee: Just a few feet from me are members of a typical German family, throwing up a tiny Christmas tree, decorating it thoroughly in accordance with all respect due to the famed Christmas tree. That was one thing I never remember having in the Stevenson annals - a Christmas tree. I don't say that we never had one, but I do not remember any. This is a peculiar Christmas to me - I can't express exactly my feelings -

Image of 1982.202.1 - Letter

1982.202.1 - Letter

From the service of Charles S. Stevenson, 314th Engineers, 89th Division, AEF. PDF of Full Transcription of Letters Available Full transcriptions of letters: Transcription for 1982.202.1 From the service of Charles S. Stevenson, 314th Engineers, 89th Division, AEF. 001_1982.202.1_Charles Stevenson to Family_September 7, 1917_Page 01 Wednesday evening Dear Folks: We left [Kansas City] at 8:15 a.m. and got here at 12:30. At Topeka we were given box lunches consisting of various sandwiches and stuff. Arriving at the Camp Funston we were divided by states. But twenty-five men from [Kansas City] left at 8:15. The others left at 8:40. We all lined up and an officer came down

Image of 1982.279.35 - Letter

1982.279.35 - Letter

See container list for individual letter transcription/cataloging PDF of Full Transcription of Letters Available 79 letters From the service of George H. Rehn, Pfc., 13th Marine Regiment, 63rd Guard Unit.

Image of 1986.213.40 - Letter

1986.213.40 - Letter

Full transcription of text follows: [jhockaday_0040_0001] Somewhere in France. Nov. 10, 1918. My Dear I.O.: I certainly want to congratulate you on your commission. You don’t know how proud I am of you. I hope you get a letter from you telling me just what you are doing. Mother writes me that you are instructing at some institute. What are the chances of your being assigned to some regiment? Well, I have been through another little scrap since I last wrote you. Believe me, the old 89th is certainly making a name for itself. We went right through those Dutchmen and took all of our objectives right on schedule time and pushed on forward after that. It seems almost as if these poor Germa

Image of 1994.41.28 - Letter

1994.41.28 - Letter

Full transcription of text follows: jdavis_0028_0001 May 18 - 1919 Dear Mother and all others your letter no 20 received a day or two ago also one from Ethel and William glad william seems to be feeling better and is able to have so much fun. We are still at Montierchaume but the indications are that we wont stay here long - may go home and again we may not glad the books finally came - I was pretty sure Turner would take good care of them but Iwas getting a little worried - glad to that Leaker jdavis_0028_0002 finally saw fit to send in his statement. It was just about what I had counted on. Idont remember whether Burnsworth is in that picture or not and Idont know just where the

Image of 2002.69.71 - Note

2002.69.71 - Note

A handwritten to do list List reads: When Squadron leaves, write letter at once to Camp Communication. See letter no. 26 -- Report with Sat Morning Report certifying daily inspection of kitchen etc. -- 1st of each month. Send report to C.O. (Regiment) given name of men in B.H. on that slot. From the World War One service of 1st Lt. then Cpt. Eldon F. Fuller, U.S. Army Infantry, R.C.; assigned to 18th Recruitment Squadron, 2nd Provisional Training Regiment, Aviation Camp, Waco, TX; 24th Co., 6th Trn. Bn., 162nd Depot Bde., 87th Div., Camp Pike, AR; Provost Guard, Military Police Co., Camp Bowie, TX; Casual Camp 2, Personnel Demobilization Center, Camp Bowie, TX.

Image of 2002.69.72 - Note

2002.69.72 - Note

A handwritten reminder of duties dated February 6, 1918. List reads: When Death of Soldier Furnish reports required by A.R. --- Death Discharge in desention after soldier having [?] or [?], will be reported to A.G. --- After the departure of a body of troops from this camp a report will be made to C.O. of Camp, showing organization or individual transferred, destination & time of departure. Same for discharge (France) --- Memo, credits ship to be sent to S. office within 24 hours after transaction --- S.C.D.-memo Feb 6/18 From the World War One service of 1st Lt. then Cpt. Eldon F. Fuller, U.S. Army Infantry, R.C.; assigned to 18th Recruitment Squadron, 2nd Provisional Train

2005.159.7 - Letter

A letter written on YMCA stationary by a man named Jess at Camp Mills to his brother, dated Sept 3, 1918.

Image of 2006.128.32 - Newspaper

2006.128.32 - Newspaper

Camp Newspaper, "The Soldier-Student", Vol. 2. No. 14. Contains articles about general news from the school, Student Council elections, school sports, poetry, jobs for veterans, and one entire page of articles written in French. From the service of Sgt. James D. Milne, 805th Aero Squadron, AEF.

2015.68.2 - Letter

From the service of Corporal Percy Hiram Daniells, Company B, 29th Engineers. 62 letters

22_March 10, 1918: Frank Fraas to Family - Date Letter Written: March 10, 1918 Letter Written By: Frank Fraas Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of text follows: ffraas_0041_0001 Camp Doniphan March 10. 1918 - Dear Sis: Receaved your letter yesterday sorry that you lost the letter after wrighting six pages. thats hard luck if you hate to wright a letter as bad as I do. Well the last time I wrote home I was on K.P. now am on stable police for a week. The drafted men got in today, they were marched streight to the isolation camp where they will have to stay for some time to see that they do not bring any disease. ffraas_0041_0002 A part of the amunition train is said to have left on the same train the drafted men came on. Col Danford left us yesterday every body hated to see him go he has done more for this regement in the short time he was with us than Klein could do in a year Klein hasent come back yet dont know who will act in his place You sure are have a time with your job but any thing that is worth any thing you have to fight to hold it these days. Has Al found any thing to do yet if he ffraas_0041_0003 [page 3] dosent find any thing tell him he can get a job here unloading wood and coal they get 3.85 a day for ten hours. Was on detail yesterday for supply Co went over to the isolation camp to get some tents for the drafted men when we get them you would have been suprised to see what a big place it is there were as many tents as there is in a compleat regement even more than that there must have been a lot more sickness ffraas_0041_0004 here than we thought there was. Guess I wont know the house when I get back the way you all are fixeing it up, but Ill bet if they would turn me loose any place on this earth Ill bet I could find it. The grass is beginning to come out in places the weather is beginning to warm up a little, had another dust shower yesterday. Yes I receaved your picture just forgot to tell you about it. Will close thanking you for the candy. Your Bro Frank.

Date Letter Written: March 10, 1918 Letter Written By: Frank Fraas Letter Written To: Family Full transcription of text follows: ffraas_0041_0001 Camp Doniphan March 10. 1918 - Dear Sis: Receaved your letter yesterday sorry that you lost the letter after wrighting six pages. thats hard luck if you hate to wright a letter as bad as I do. Well the last time I wrote home I was on K.P. now am on stable police for a week. The drafted men got in today, they were marched streight to the isolation camp where they will have to stay for some time to see that they do not bring any disease. ffraas_0041_0002 A part of the amunition train is said to have left on the same train the drafted

30_January 5, 1919: Dr. Charles Irons to Family - Date Letter Written: January 5, 1919 Letter Written By: Dr. Charles Irons Letter Written To: Family Topics included in letter: Likes the weather; Going out for a ride; Received a letter from Sterrett in Shanghai-secured passage for family on the Tenyo Maru; Russian word for immediately used too often; Gives the schedule of how Russians conduct business; Shops close at four or five-might as well stay closed with nothing to sell; Sugar is $2.50 for thirteen ounces in Miass; Matches, which cost 1 cent at home are fifteen cents here; Bread is $1.00; Tinkham of Shanghai had to leave Ufa so quickly before arrival of Bs. that he lost all bedding and clothes-now on the way back to front, assigned to Russian troops; YMCA man was in his car at the front and through a traitor of the Russian guard the Czech train was surrounded by Bs.-escaped through one side of the car and stayed in the woods-one of his helpers was killed and another injured; Cannot trust Russian soldiers-may be Bs.; Enclosing picture of interpreter-see if there is an opening for him in Chicago-speaks French, Russian, German, English and Czech; Many Bohemian businesses in Chicago and they might be looking for a man of his type; Misses family; Weather gets 45 below; Have a fine horse and saddle; Russian horses have a lot of energy; Will accompany Bohemian troops home; Having trouble finishing letter-Dr. Mikuliasek will spend the night again; Tuesday evening is Russian Christmas eve-soon it will be Chinese New Year and Chai will want to celebrate; Asks forgiveness for gloominess in previous letter; Expresses homesickness and sadness; Will not be with second regiment permanently; Will leave here for another place; Will stay with first division as originally appointed; Will appear in full Czech regalia; Received an invitation to tea by a young lady educated in America; Wants to speak to an American, and to eat his wife's cooking; Mentions more dental records.

Date Letter Written: January 5, 1919 Letter Written By: Dr. Charles Irons Letter Written To: Family Topics included in letter: Likes the weather; Going out for a ride; Received a letter from Sterrett in Shanghai-secured passage for family on the Tenyo Maru; Russian word for immediately used too often; Gives the schedule of how Russians conduct business; Shops close at four or five-might as well stay closed with nothing to sell; Sugar is $2.50 for thirteen ounces in Miass; Matches, which cost 1 cent at home are fifteen cents here; Bread is $1.00; Tinkham of Shanghai had to leave Ufa so quickly before arrival of Bs. that he lost all bedding and clothes-now on the way back to front, ass

July 15, 1917: Selah to John Hoover Price - Date Letter Written: July 15, 1917 Letter written By: Selah, Pine, Colorado Letter Written To: John Hoover Price, Fort Logan, Colorado Topics include in Letter: Mail - Just got back from standing in line for the mail. A letter came from Mr. James Marion Price [John's father]; Jobs - She talks about how Mr. Price sent her a character reference and she is grateful for it. She goes on to say that she accepted a job as a stenographer for $15 dollars a week at the local Pine dispensary. She then talks how when she told her family about the job and they weren't thrilled that the job was in Pine. She is happy that she is at Pine; Family - She stresses that John should feel lucky that he as such a great mother and father; Curse words - She talks about how 'damn' is her favorite curse word; Cookies - She comments on how her mom is making cookies; Letter writing - She says she is going to write John's father and she is going to write a long one. [Was in the same envelope as the letters from Loyd (09_2004.71.19) and Lenore (11_2004.71.19)]

Date Letter Written: July 15, 1917 Letter written By: Selah, Pine, Colorado Letter Written To: John Hoover Price, Fort Logan, Colorado Topics include in Letter: Mail - Just got back from standing in line for the mail. A letter came from Mr. James Marion Price [John's father]; Jobs - She talks about how Mr. Price sent her a character reference and she is grateful for it. She goes on to say that she accepted a job as a stenographer for $15 dollars a week at the local Pine dispensary. She then talks how when she told her family about the job and they weren't thrilled that the job was in Pine. She is happy that she is at Pine; Family - She stresses that John should feel lucky that he as such

November 25, 1917: Percy Daniells to Mother - Date Letter Written: November 25, 1917 Letter Written To: Mother, Location not indicated Letter Written By: Percy Daniells, Locatin not indicated Topics included in letter: Enlisting and haivng to leave because of it; Seeing a friend; On a train currently, how they are traveling and who with; His bunkmates and what they do for a living; Attempting to get ahold of a friend to meet up in NYC; Number of pages: 1

Date Letter Written: November 25, 1917 Letter Written To: Mother, Location not indicated Letter Written By: Percy Daniells, Locatin not indicated Topics included in letter: Enlisting and haivng to leave because of it; Seeing a friend; On a train currently, how they are traveling and who with; His bunkmates and what they do for a living; Attempting to get ahold of a friend to meet up in NYC; Number of pages: 1